Oblate Program at Belmont Abbey, NC

Tag Archive for ‘Lectio Divina’

The Importance of Lectio Divina

I consider that lectio divina is an important component of the mature and active years of the spiritual life; its absence diminishes the vitality of these years and may eventually lead to shipwreck. Our efforts to establish priorities in our life will be smoother, perhaps, if we recognize that lectio divina has the right to […]

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Study and Savour the Word of God

The author of the Letter to the Hebrews wrote: “Indeed, the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing until it divides soul from spirit, joints from marrow; it is able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart” (4:12). It is necessary to take seriously the injunction to […]

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Persevere In Lectio Divina

And by experience we see that many persons who recite a great number of vocal prayers. the Office and the Rosary, fall into sin, and continue to live in sin. But he who attends to mental prayer scarcely ever falls into sin, and should he have the misfortune of falling into it, he will hardly […]

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St. Dominic on Lectio Divina

Saint Dominic, had yet another manner of praying at once beautiful, devout, and pleasing, which he practiced after the canonical hours and the thanksgiving following meals. He was then zealous and filled with the spirit of devotion which he drew from the divine words which had been sung in the choir or refectory. Our father […]

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Listening and Lectio Divina

Listening is a very demanding activity. We can see this al­ready on the psychological level. Other experiences such as seeing or touching involve considerable passivity and inertia. I establish contact with an objective reality placed before me. But listening is something else. I am placed before a person who wishes to establish communion with me, […]

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Give Primary Attention to Scriptures

You then, my true son, give primary attention to reading the divine Scriptures. Be attentive: for we must be attentive when reading the things of God, so that we not say or think anything too reckless about them. . . . Being attentive to divine reading, seek correctly and with unwavering faith in God the […]

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On Lectio Divina

120. Next, at fixed hours time should be given to certain definite reading. For haphazard reading, constantly varied and as if lighted on by chance does not edify but makes the mind unstable; taken into the memory lightly, it goes out from it even more lightly. But you should concentrate on certain authors and let […]

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Spirit of Reverence shapes Lectio Divina

Five ways in which the spirit of reverence shapes lectio divina: Reverence propels us toward silence, and silence enables us to listen. Reverence will cause us to surround our reading with safeguards to its seriousness. Reverence for God’s Word means respect for the text of the Bible. . . . It points to a zeal […]

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Which is Greater: The Word or Body of Christ?

Brothers and sisters, here is a question for you: Which to you seems the greater, the word of God or the body of Christ? If you want to give the right answer you will reply that God’s word is not less than Christ’s body. Therefore, just as we take care when we receive the body […]

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Lectio Divina and Prayer

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